Mixing Up Character: Child Development in the Kitchen

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Mixing Up Character: Child Development in the Kitchen

Delicious cookies baked by Jeffrey Deleon Vaca.

Delicious cookies baked by Jeffrey Deleon Vaca.

Jeffrey Deleon Vaca

Delicious cookies baked by Jeffrey Deleon Vaca.

Jeffrey Deleon Vaca

Jeffrey Deleon Vaca

Delicious cookies baked by Jeffrey Deleon Vaca.

Jeffrey Deleon Vaca, Fall Author

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Children around the world love to create their own dishes and make people smile. But could this really help children’s development beyond their culinary skills?

Young children in the kitchen can lead to developing mathematical skills, while also helping communication. Baking and cooking, in general, both teach important skills; for example, patience, giving, as well as caring for others.

Sydney Di Cosimo, a WMS 7th grader, said, “Baking made [me] want to give more to the people around [me]”. She was inspired to do so by her mother that ”repeatedly made sweets”. This was while Di Cosimo was five years old and in kindergarten.

Social skills can also come into play. Learning how to share and cooperate, children will most likely learn these skills by working with others, for example, parents, siblings, and friends.

Children also learn how to be responsible for themselves and others, since baking takes so much patience and precise measurements, this can lead to why children that bake or even cook can develop these characteristics as time goes on.

Ms.G, 7th-grade math teacher, loves to bake and thinks that baking makes people “come together”. As well, they get to share all of their different “cultures”.

Cooking and baking for children while they’re young can lead to new opportunities in the field of culinary arts. There are many culinary arts schools in New Jersey alone, but much more in the USA as a whole.

Amily Decena, a WMS 7th grader, loves to cook and would want to pursue this art in the future. She has met new people because the community of culinary arts is so big and now she can easily “get closer with other people with the same interests”.

At the end of the day, children love to bake and cook while making people happy. Social skills, math, and communication all help children grow in their everyday lives and baking and cooking can further those skills.

 

 

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